Archives For Amy Carmichael

Amy Carmichael with children2 thumb

Poet and missionary Amy Carmichael spent years in India working to help the poor, widowed, and orphaned around her. Among her writings is a book called His Thoughts Said; His Father Said, which imagines conversations between a child of God and his Heavenly Father. In this excerpt the Son [Christian] can find no words with which to praise his Beloved [God]:

“The Son greatly wished to make a song of lovely things to sing to his Beloved–-but he could not find singing words.

He heard the voice of his Beloved saying, ‘You are walking on the road where all who love Me walk. Some of them walked this way singing, and they’ve left their songs behind them.

Find their songs. Sing their words. They will be your song to Me.””

Sing their words

We can celebrate the Songs of Those Who Love Him wherever we find them.

In great lives from the past. In the words of talented authors. In songs and hymns and spiritual songs. In the lives of inspiring people we meet online. In the lives of everyday folks we find next to us in the pew at church. In whatever is true, honorable, right, pure, lovely, admirable, and excellent.

And we can encourage each other to stay on the right path–-the Road Where All Who Love Him Walk.

I once read a great testimony but could not find the source. A certain hard-living artist/painter came to Christ late in his life. But the bad habits he’d formed over the years proved difficult to break. He often slipped from his resolutions and fell into his old ways.

His friends began to ridicule his attempts to share Christ with them. They questioned his Christianity and whether or not his faith was real. His reply went something like this:

“What if we’re all lost in the woods, searching for some way out of the labyrinth of trees and thorns and thickets, and I find the way that leads to safety, peace and happiness?

Whether I walk that road with vigor and purpose or stumble along it drunkenly,

It’s still the right road.”

Perhaps we’ve made bad choices that we cannot undo. Perhaps happy days have passed that we cannot recapture. Perhaps the way forward holds change and uncertainty. Or perhaps the way forward holds too much of the same old thing, and we’re losing our enthusiasm for enduring it.

Be encouraged, friends. If we’re following the Savior, it’s still the right road!

***I made this graphic with a photo from my account at RGB Stock Photos & tweaked it with PicMonkey. So feel free to Pin, Tweet, download & share.

***This article is a repost from 2010. Continue Reading…

Amy Carmichael 2 world quote 2

Feel free to download & share

Backstory: I love these beautiful quotes from two women poets. Amy Carmichael was a missionary to India, founded the Dohnavur Fellowship (which sheltered over 1,000 children), and published 35 books. Christina Rossetti wrote the Christmas carol In the Bleak Midwinter and is considered second only to Elizabeth Barrett Browning as greatest female poet of the Victorian Era. ***And the photo is an iPhone pic I snapped of our Catskills on my way home from school this past fall.

Tweetables: It is a safe thing to trust Him to fulfill the desires which He creates. Amy Carmichael (Click to Tweet)

Were there no God, we would be in this glorious world with grateful hearts and no one to thank. Christina Rossetti (Click to Tweet) Continue Reading…

A cup brimful . . .

Renee Ann Smith —  March 9, 2012 — 7 Comments

“If a sudden jar can cause me to speak an impatient, unloving word, then I know nothing of Calvary love. For a cup brimful of sweet water cannot spill even one drop of bitter water, however suddenly jolted.” ~Amy Carmichael~

“A good man brings good things out of the good stored up in his heart, and an evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in his heart. For the mouth speaks what the heart is full of.” ~Luke 6:45 NIV~

Amy Carmichael, missionary to India's children

“You don’t get wormy apples off a healthy tree, nor good apples off a diseased tree. The health of the apple tells the health of the tree. It’s who you are, not what you say and do, that counts. Your true being brims over into true words and deeds.” ~Luke 6:45 from The Message~

I’m thankful God sees all that is inside us, loves us anyway, and so generously shares His Spirit to make us like His Son! That alone is reason enough to rejoice!

Have a great weekend, friends!

Reflections . . .

Renee Ann Smith —  November 30, 2011 — 30 Comments

“As water reflects the face, so one’s life reflects the heart.”
~Proverbs 27:10~

What’s in my heart? Too often I find impatience and bitter feelings that scald the ones I love . . .

“If a sudden jar can cause me to speak an impatient, unloving word, then I know nothing of Calvary love. For a cup brimful of sweet water cannot spill even one drop of bitter water, however suddenly jolted.”
~Amy Carmichael~

“My people have committed two sins: They have forsaken me, the spring of living water, and have dug their own cisterns, broken cisterns that cannot hold water.”
~Jeremiah 2:13~

That’s why God must empty me—so that He can fill me again with that sweet, life-giving water. He helps me let all the ugliness go. And replaces it with Himself.

Selah! Pause and think of that!

The inner fire

Renee Ann Smith —  October 19, 2011 — 20 Comments

“In everyone’s life, at some time, the inner fire goes out. It is then burst into flame by an encounter with another human being. We should all be thankful for those people who rekindle the inner fire.” ~Albert Schweitzer~

C. S. Lewis

Corrie ten Boom with Billy Graham

Darlene Deibler Rose

Jim Elliot

J. R. R. Tolkien

Elisabeth Elliot

Amy Carmichael

Who would you add to this list?

Love can be a hard word. In conversations, we tend to overuse it or abuse it. Some love everything; others, nothing. We live in a culture that changes the definition of love to fit each new whim or fancy. And how many folks do we know who’ve wasted their lives “looking for love in all the wrong places”?

Sometimes the best way to understand love is to take note of the actions and attitudes that do NOT demonstrate love. Why are the negatives so recognizable? Because it’s easy to focus on ourselves and what we want. So that seems to be the default position from which we approach life.

I often re-read a little book by missionary poet Amy Carmichael that attempts to capture in words what love is not and then encourages us to do the opposite. It’s called If. Here are a few excerpts:

If a sudden jar can cause me to speak an impatient, unloving word, then I know nothing of Calvary love. For a cup brimful of sweet water cannot spill even one drop of bitter water, however suddenly jolted.

If I take offense easily; if I am content to continue in cold unfriendliness, though friendship be possible, then I know nothing of Calvary love.

If the ultimate, the hardest, cannot be asked of me; if my fellows hesitate to ask it and turn to someone else, then I know nothing of Calvary love.

If I belittle those whom I am called to serve, talk of their weak points in contrast perhaps with what I think of as my strong points; if I adopt a superior attitude, forgetting “Who made thee to differ? And what hast thou that thou hast not received?” Then I know nothing of Calvary love.

If I cast up a confessed, repented, and forsaken sin against another, and allow my remembrance of that sin to colour my thinking and feed my suspicions, then I know nothing of Calvary love.

If the praise of man elates me and his blame depresses me; if I cannot rest under misunderstanding without defending myself; if I love to be loved more than to love, to be served more than to serve, then I know nothing of Calvary love.

In just about any page of the book, I can see myself and be convicted of an attitude I need to let God transform!

If you’d like some devotional reading by an interesting Christian woman from the past, you can follow this link to download a free version of If by Amy Carmichael.

This next link will take you to free downloads of two of Amy’s lesser known works at the Project Gutenberg site.

Not familiar with Project Gutenberg? According to Wikipedia, it’s a volunteer effort to digitize and archive cultural works, to encourage the creation and distribution of eBooks. I’ve found all kinds of classic authors at PG: L. M. Montgomery, Louisa May Alcott, C. S. Lewis, Charles Dickens and so many more.

Just another reason to “love” technology! Blessings all!

Poet and missionary Amy Carmichael spent years in India working to help the poor, widowed, and orphaned around her. She wrote a book called His Thoughts Said; His Father Said to record conversations between a child of God and his/her Heavenly Father. In this excerpt the Son [Christian] can find no words with which to praise his Beloved [God]:

Amy Carmichael

The Son greatly wished to make a song of lovely things to sing to his Beloved–but he could not find singing words.

He heard the voice of his Beloved saying, “You are walking on the road where all who love Me walk. Some of them walked this way singing, and they’ve left their songs behind them.

Find their songs. Sing their words. They will be your song to Me.”

In 2011, let’s celebrate the Songs of Those Who Love Him wherever we find them.

In great lives from the past. In the words of talented authors. In songs and hymns and spiritual songs. In the lives of inspiring people we meet online. In the lives of everyday folks we find next to us in the pew at church. In whatever is true, honorable, right, pure, lovely, admirable, and excellent.

And let’s encourage each other to stay on the right path–the Road Where All Who Love Him Walk.

I once read a great testimony but could not find the source from feeble attempts at research. A certain hard-living artist/painter came to Christ late in his life. But the bad habits he’d formed over the years proved difficult to break. He often slipped from his resolutions and fell into his old ways. His friends began to ridicule his attempts to share Christ with them. They questioned his Christianity and whether or not his faith was real. His reply went something like this:

If we were all lost in the woods, searching for some way out of the labyrinth of trees and thorns and thickets, and I found the way that led to safety, peace and happiness–whether I walk that road with vigor and purpose or stumble along it drunkenly

It’s still the right road.

Forgive my poetic license and keep that in mind whenever you stumble along the way or fear what lies ahead or feel tempted to find an off ramp.

Perhaps we’ve made bad choices that we cannot undo. Perhaps happy days have passed that we cannot recapture. Perhaps the way forward holds change and uncertainty. Or perhaps the way forward holds too much of the same old thing, and we’re losing our enthusiasm for enduring it.

Take heart, friends. If we’re following the Savior, it’s still the right road!

Happy, happy 2011!